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Authors/New Voices current issue Introducing Breve New Stories Notes of Inspiration Writing/Reading

Writer’s Blog: Trudy Duffy-Wigman – The Idea Behind ‘My New Best Friend’

Trudy Duffy-Wigman talks about what inspired her flash fiction ‘My New Best Friend‘ published in Breve New Stories Issue Two.

Do you know that awkward moment when you hop on a bus or a train and you notice something is out of kilter? You hear the collective intake of breath by your fellow passengers and slowly realise that you are trapped – someone wants your attention, and you are going to give it, like it or not.
That is the inspiration behind this story. After decades of using public transport in every form and shape I can honestly say that overheard conversations, observations and interactions on tram, train or bus is where a lot of my ideas come from. Like the time I got on a tram in Amsterdam that happened to be full of drunken football supporters. Like the time we took the train from St Petersburg to Moscow armed with wet towels because criminals were gassing compartments to steal passengers’ credit cards. And like the time I got on a night bus in Glasgow and heard a lament from an inebriated, lonely soul.
And what do we, being sober and upright citizens, do in such situations? We don’t want to be involved. We turn away, afraid that eye contact means we are stuck with this person for the duration of the journey. We tune out the lament; blame it on the drink or the drugs. We forget this person is someone’s son, someone’s friend, a human being.
That is what the story is about. It comes not from one particular encounter; rather it is an amalgamation of several observations; I think most people will recognise it, having been in a similar situation. It is a story that needs to be told and it doesn’t need a lot of words.

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Authors/New Voices Introducing Breve New Stories

Little Magazine Life 2

November marks six months since Breve New Stories project was launched. These months have been full of great satisfactions and experiences. The first call for entries has seen more than one hundred stories submitted. We have many Facebook, Twitter and Breve Newsletter subscribers and the long awaited ‘Issue Zero’ is finally out. Now it’s time to think of the future.FullSizeRender (5)

The incredible gift of reading such an eclectic mix of interesting stories and talking to immensely talented and promising writers encourages us to keep working hard on this big dream despite the limited resources. Breve is a self-funded publishing project put together by a small team, although most of the time it’ s a team of one (!) fuelled not only by the passion for literature, but also by the kind words of its supporters, as well as the many, many cups of tea.

In order for Breve magazine to continue growing we are introducig a few changes.

Issues will not be published monthly as we had previously planned but will be bimonthly instead, starting from January 2016. Issue One will then be the first of six issues, and we are very much lookking forward to offering you you great short fiction for the coming year.  We will still have space on our blog for each author to talk about their projects and inspirations and we hope this will encourage our readers to take part in the debate, writing to us and spreading the word. Our dream is still to bring on print new and beautiful short fiction and to let as many people as possible know how much we love it, and our goal is to really support the contributors by offering visibility and, hopefully soon, a real cheque.

To achieve all this we need all the support you are willing to give. There is always more than one way to help when you believe in an idea: every little helps.

You can donate from £1 up to however much you are able and/or willing to pay, to receive a copy of Issue Zero and start your collection of Breve New Stories magazine (it will be worth A LOT in a few years).

You can pre-order a copy of Issue One that will be delivered to you in January 2016, just when the winter blues kicks in and you need a literary pick-me-up!

You can share your love by reblogging this post, send it to a friend, share it on Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Google+…go crazy!

You can stock Breve New Stories in your bookshop, shop, cafe, kiosk….

You can ask for a complimentary press copy of Issue Zero and review Breve on your blog/website/magazine.

You can send us your amazing short stories and flash fiction to be published on Breve.

You can leave a comment, send us an email or a picture if you like what you read and you want to see more. We welcome positive and helpful feedback more than anything!

 

 

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Introducing Breve New Stories Writing/Reading

The Emerging Writer

Breve New Stories seeks submissions from new and emerging authors.cropped-cropped-cropped-img_0476.jpg

Despite the vagueness of the term emerging, we received many entries from writers that recognised themselves as such. Conventionally, an emergent author or artist is one that has some evidence of professional achievement but not a substantial record of accomplishment and who is not recognised as established by other artists, curators, critics and industry insiders. This description focuses more on the financial/professional status of being an author than on the individual development of the writer per se, the process of learning the craft and the daily challenges of creation.

The term works as a sort of barrier between writers published by medium/big publishing houses that have plenty of press coverage, who market aggressively for their authors and can therefore often guarantee them a consistent compensation, and all the remaining authors in the most different places, be that writing on-line or self publishing. At the same time emergent writers represent a pool of talents from which the mainstream industry often outsources the best, freshest  and most innovative works of literature. There is also no way to deny that in this process are involved, other than talent, lots of luck and lots of politics. It is a sad but widely known truth in all creative environments, but one that doesn’t stop writers from writing and wanting to ’emerge’.

Breve‘s look on this is this: the writer is the one who writes, who consistently strives to refine one’s skills by giving time and energy to one’s work. The writer is the one that is brave enough to embrace the challenge and takes the risk not only to write, but to be read by others. Emerging writers, as new writers, are not second class authors, they can only be good or bad writers, and together with the so-called ‘established’ authors, are writers in progress, working everyday on their skills, styles and inspirations. The literary quality of a work does not necessarily run parallel to the hierarchy of establishment.

Today there are many ways to pursue this goal: the Internet,  self publishing, MFA in creative writing  and literary projects such as Breve. All these opportunities are viable but all of them ask writers to look beyond their ambition for status to what writing means to them, they all ask: how bad do you want to write? That bad? Then be a writer.

Two different intakes on the emerging writer:

 https://overland.org.au/2013/05/pity-the-emerging-writer-or-not/

http://www.emergingwritersfestival.org.au/2013/06/emerging-writers-festival-2013-keynote-astrid-lorange/